Course Student Learning Outcomes (Econ)

Course Student Learning Outcomes - Word Document

Econ 1000: Economics of Public Issues

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Apply economic reasoning to the analysis of selected contemporary economic problems.
  • Understand how households (demand) and businesses (supply) interact in various market structures to determine price and quantity of goods and services produced and consumed.
  • Analyze the efficiency and equity implications of government interference in markets.
  • Recognize and identify situations leading to market failures and government failures. 
  • Evaluate the intent and outcomes of government stabilization policies designed to correct macroeconomic problems. 
  • Use economic problem solving skills to discuss the opportunities and challenges of the increasing globalization of the world economy. 

 

Econ 2301: Principles of Microeconomics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand how households (demand) and businesses (supply) interact in various market structures to determine price and quantity of a good produced.
  • Understand the links between household behavior and the economic models of demand.
  • Represent demand, in graphical form, including the downward slope of the demand curve and what shifts the demand curve.
  • Understand the links between production costs and the economic models of supply.
  • Represent supply, in graphical form, including the upward slope of the supply curve and what shifts the supply curve.
  • Understand the efficiency and equity implications of market interference, including government policy.
  • Understand how different degrees of competition in a market affect pricing and output.
  • Apply economic reasoning to individual and firm behavior.
  • Understand the meaning of marginal revenue and marginal cost and their relevance for firm profitability.
  • Understand the major characteristics of different market structures and the implications for the behavior of the firm.

 

Econ 2302: Principles of Macroeconomics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand why household, business, government and global behavior determine the aggregate demand for goods and services
  • Understand why the behavior of businesses and the rest of the world determine the aggregate supply of goods and services
  • Understand how aggregate demand and aggregate supply interact to drive a free market economy
  • Understand the implications of interference in a market economy, including government policy
  • Understand the basics of national income accounting
  • Understand the causes and consequences of business cycles
  • Understand the roles of fiscal and monetary policy in fighting recessions and inflation
  • Understand factors that contribute to and detract from long-term economic growth
  • Apply economic reasoning to understand the operation of an economy
  • Understand the interaction between the domestic economy and the rest of the world
  • Be able to apply basic international trade and finance concepts to global pricing issues, including working with exchange rates

 

Econ 3000: Microeconomic Theory

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Make decisions using marginal analysis and opportunity costs.
  • Use supply and demand to determine changes in market equilibrium (price and output), changes in welfare, and analyze the impact of government policies.
  • Understand the relationship between marginal utility and price in equilibrium.
  • Explain why firms exist.
  • Develop cost functions from production functions.
  • Be able to determine the profit maximizing price and output for a firm operating in a competitive environment.
  • Determine profit maximizing price and output for a monopoly firm.
  • Evaluate various policies for regulating monopolies.
  • Be able to determine profit maximizing price and output for a firm in a quasi-competitive market (oligopoly or monopolistic competition).
  • Develop and evaluate the impact of government regulations.
  • Explain relationship between wages and productivity and apply the model to real-world businesses.
  • Be able to apply the concepts of supply and demand to markets with external costs and benefits (understand market failure, implications for regulation, optimal pollution level).
  • Use comparative static analysis (changes in supply and/or demand), measures of consumer and producer welfare, government intervention (price ceilings and floors).
  • Understand the nature and consequences of general equilibrium (Pareto optimality).

Econ 3005: Macro-Economic Theory

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Measure living standards, inflation, and unemployment for use as economic indicators.
  • Understand the structure and decision-making authority of the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury, respectively.
  • Understanding the perspective of classical economists on the nature and causes of the wealth of nations.
  • Understand the factors determining gross domestic product, employment, the general level of prices, and interest rates.
  • Explain the differences between the classical and Keynesian approaches to understanding the macro economy, including the political implications of each approach and the role of an activist fiscal policy in the Keynesian approach.
  • Analyze the determinants of the relative strengths of fiscal and monetary policy for affecting gross domestic product.
  • Understand the importance of wage flexibility and price expectations for the impact of spending behavior on gross domestic production, the unemployment rate, and the rate of inflation.
  • Understand monetarist, supply-siders’, and New Classical approaches to macroeconomic issues.
  • Learn the determinants of long-term economic growth, including the role of saving and investment on the rate of growth.
  • Understand the role of international trade, international finance and exchange rates in affecting living standards.
  • Analyze the factors that determine currency exchange rates and the impact of changes in exchange rates on exports and imports.

 

Econ 3006: Macroeconomics for Business

Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Understand the structure and decision-making authority of the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury, respectively.
  • Understand the factors determining gross domestic product, employment, the general level of prices, and interest rates.
  • Measure living standards, inflation, and unemployment for use as economic indicators.
  • Analyze the determinants of the relative strengths of fiscal and monetary policy for affecting gross domestic product.
  • Learn the determinants of long-term economic growth, including the role of saving and investment on the rate of growth.
  • Understand the role of international trade in affecting living standards.
  • Analyze the factors that determine currency exchange rates and the impact of changes in exchange rates on exports and imports.
  • Learn to access national and international macroeconomic data.
  • Learn how to access and interpret forecasts using macroeconomic data.

Econ 3107: Global Economic Analysis

Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Use their understanding of international trade and finance models to better identify the impact on the global operations of firms from changes in macroeconomic, international trade and investment policies.
  • Understand how interest rates, inflation rates, asset prices and exchange rates are determined and affect each other so as to use this knowledge in practical decision making.
  • Understand the workings and roles of various international economic institutions, (such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization), and how they may impact the global operation and decision making of firms.
  • Use their knowledge about financial instruments, macroeconomic policy and the mechanics of finance to develop optimal hedging, speculation, risk management, and portfolio allocation strategies.

Econ 3150: Economic History of the United States

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the pace and course of American economic development.
  • Understand the development of American economic institutions and policies.
  • Apply economic theory to understand the sources of American economic growth.
  • Apply economic theory to understand the economic dimensions of social and political issues in American history.

 

Econ 3170: History of Economic Thought

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the evolution of modern economic theories.
  • Understand the sources of controversies in modern economics.
  • Appreciate well-developed economic theories and distinguish them from inconsistent ones.

 

Econ 3200: Comparative Economic Systems

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the nature of an economic system; varieties of economic systems.
  • Understand various possible criteria for judging the success of economic systems.
  • Understand the relationships among the concepts of “market failure,” “government failure,” property rights, transaction costs, and culture.
  • Understand the nature of anarchy and possible explanations for the emergence of government.
  • Understand the nature of minimal-state libertarianism and its assumptions about government failure; the northern United States before the American Civil War.
  • Understand the nature of classical liberalism and its assumptions about market failure and economic inequalities; capitalism and historians of the “Industrial Revolution” and the Great Depression.
  • Understand the nature of social democracy and its assumptions about the systematic effects of empowering the state to confiscate some people’s assets and incomes for the benefit of others.
  • Understand classical and modern versions of Marxism.
  • Understand the famous “calculation debate” concerning the feasibility and potential of socialism;
  • Understand the assumptions of market socialism; realities of Hungary pre-1989.
  • Understand the economics of syndicalism; realities of the former Yugoslavia.
  • Understand the nature of centrally-planned economies; Mao Zedong’s China and the former Soviet Union; the relationship between economic freedom and political freedom.
  • Understand the nature of efforts to transform Russia and China.
    • Understand the dynamics of democratic, “mixed or middle-way economies”.

Econ 3310: Money, Banking, and Financial Intermediaries

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of the financial sector in directing the use of scarce capital.
  • Understand the concepts of present value and internal rate of return.
  • Explain the determinants of interest rates.
  • Understand the term structure of interest rates.
  • Understand the likely path of interest rates in the aftermath of a change in monetary policy.
  • Understand the impact of inflation on interest rates.
  • Understand various concepts of yield or rate of return.
  • Understand the concept of duration and its implications for the magnitude of changes in asset prices following changes in interest rates.
  • Explain the various ways to hedge interest rate risk.
  • Understand various money market instruments.
  • Understand how monetary and fiscal policy affects the financial system.
  • Explain the components of the balance of payments, the factors that determine currency exchange rates, and ways to cope with exchange rate risk.

 

Econ 3370: Public Sector Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Apply microeconomic theories to public decision making.
  • Explain public goods, externalities, and government interventions using microeconomic theories.
  • Critically assess U.S. tax policy from practical and theoretical economic perspectives.
  • Effectively communicate the rationales for government intervention in the economy and their shortcomings.

 

Econ 3375: Public Choice: The Economics of Politics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Articulate how it is possible that even when a majority of voters is opposed to a policy, politicians will adopt the policy.
  • Articulate the concepts of the form of government and the scope of government. For example, the form may be democracy, but if the scope is unlimited – i.e., if a majority can enact whatever it wants without constitutional restraint – we have what Jefferson called an "elective despotism."
  • Articulate the historical and logical implications of different property rights regimes.
  • Articulate the phenomenon called the "tragedy of the commons" and the implications of the variety of solutions that have been offered to this problem.
  • Articulate how economic theory can be applied in a wide variety of areas other than business – e.g., crime, the family, education and traffic congestion.

 

Econ 3500: Urban Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Trace the evolution of cities and urban areas, including the economic incentives for their development.
  • Explain the economic need for different sized cities.
  • Use economic theories to explain factors determining the location of urban centers.
  • Assess the impact of city ordinances (e.g., zoning, growth controls) on urban economic development.
  • Understand the development of regional metropolitan economies.
  • Assess the market for housing, including federal, state, and local policies that influence price, quality, and quantity of housing.
  • Assess the economic underpinnings and issues of selected urban problems (e.g., poverty, transportation, education, employment).

 

Econ 3551: Managerial Economics and Business Strategy

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Apply economic principles to management decisions.
  • Understand the basic forces governing the operation of competitive markets.
  • Analyze the implications of various elasticities of consumer demand for pricing and location decisions.
  • Characterize consumer and worker preferences and constraints. Analyze implications for employee compensation packages.
  • Quantify the determinants of consumer demand.
  • Characterize the conditions necessary for efficient input usage.
  • Characterize an efficient scale of operation.
  • Distinguish relevant from irrelevant costs for economic decision-making.
  • Characterize the conditions under which a loss-making enterprise should continue to operate in the short run and long run.
  • Characterize the conditions under which an enterprise should shut down in the short run and long run.
  • Articulate the conditions that give rise to pricing power.
  • Determine how a firm with pricing power should exercise it.
  • Determine if and how a firm can engage in price discrimination or implement two-part pricing.
  • Analyze possible strategies in the event a firm is one of just a few companies in a market.
  • Analyze the conditions under which an advertising campaign is most likely to be advantageous.
  • Analyze the factors that determine the supply and demand for productive inputs.
  • Determine the extent to which economic institutions (e.g., labor unions, government regulations) will influence compensation and employment decisions.

 

Econ 3680: Labor Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Explain labor market trends using data about the labor market.
  • Explain labor supply for an individual and society.
  • Augment neoclassical labor supply with the theory of allocation of time.
  • Explain returns to schooling, on the job training, migration, employer-sponsored health care, and education using human capital theory.
  • Explain labor demand for firms operating in competitive and monopolistic markets using marginal productivity theory.
  • Understand wage and employment in bilateral monopolies and perfect competition
  • Explain wage schemes and structures within firms using “personnel economics”.
  • Understand the historical and present day impact of unions on labor market operations.
  • Explain a variety of constraints on labor mobility and operations (e.g., policies, labor institutions, job search).

 

Econ 4000: Mathematical Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand and replicate the connections between diagrammatic models and their underlying formal mathematical structures using algebra and calculus
  • Develop numerical examples and algebraic models to illustrate a variety of theoretical economic results
  • Understand and use the mathematical tools of algebra, calculus and probability in a variety of economic models
  • Recognize the strengths and shortcomings of mathematical models in economics

 

Econ 4306: Environmental Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Apply basic principles of economics to environmental issues.
  • Explain how something can be both “environmentally destructive” and “economically optimal”; and how something can be environmentally beneficial and economically suboptimal.
  • Understand the relationship between economic development and population growth; how population growth affects economic development; how economic development affects population growth; the economics of traffic congestion.
  • Know basic economic models pertaining to the use of depletable resources; depletable vs. renewable resources.
  • Understand risk-benefit analysis; the economics of nuclear power.
  • Understand the economics of solid-waste disposal and recycling.
  • Understand the economics of water conservation; the impact of alternative property rights structures.
  • Understand the economics of forests and fisheries; whaling; bioeconomic models; applications to other forms of wildlife.
  • Understand basic approaches to pollution control; “optimal” pollution and optimal pollution control.
  • Understand the economics of controlling air pollution from stationary vs. mobile sources.
  • Understand the economics of water pollution; toxic wastes.
  • Understand the economics of climate change.

 

Econ 4315: Monetary Theory

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand various concepts of money and money substitutes
  • Understand the sources of money and money substitutes
  • Explain and anticipate the consequences of changes in the quantity of money on such economic variables as interest rates, inflation, the exchange rate, and unemployment

 

Econ 4400: Introduction to Econometrics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Use the many variations of the multiple regression model to study the relationships between variables.
  • Understand the concept of a random variable and probability distributions.
  • Use various sample statistics to estimation population values.
  • Interpret relationships using confidence intervals.
  • Analyze economic data.
  • Make effective use of the statistical tools used by economists.
  • Understand the assumptions underlying those statistical tools.
  • Apply the statistical tools that economists use to analyze data.
  • Understand estimation issues and their implications including, biased selection, non-linearity, heteroskedasticity and mulitcollinearity

 

Econ 4520: Industrial Organization and Public Policy

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Critically assess the efficacy of current industrial policy using microeconomic theory.
  • Explain the costs and benefits of regulation and antitrust policy.
  • Effectively communicate the structure, conduct, performance paradigm and its shortcomings and extensions.

 

Econ 4590: Selected Topics in Economic Analysis

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Learn how to think critically about public policy issues
  • Understand how microeconomic concepts can be applied to the analysis of a variety of public policy issues
  • Understand how empirical research methods can be applied to a variety of public policy issues
  • Understand the forces that shape the way in which public policy decisions are actually made

 

Econ 4700: International Trade

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the various reasons why countries engage in international trade, including the direction and volume of trade between nations.
  • Use models of trade to demonstrate the gains from exchange as well as the effects on income distribution within countries due to trade with foreign nations.
  • Understand how international factor mobility affects an economy.
  • Analyze current issues and policies using the concepts of international trade theory.
  • Understand the role key international institutions play in affecting trade flows across the world.

 

Econ 4705: International Finance

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the accounting methods and concepts used by countries to keep track of international transactions.
  • Understand the role of exchange rates and how they are determined in the short-run and long-run.
  • Analyze how various policies, both domestic and foreign, may affect exchange rates and economic welfare.
  • Understand the functioning of various exchange rate regimes, (such as gold standards and floating exchange rate mechanisms).
  • Understand the role played by various international institutions with regards to exchange rate values and the flow on international assets.

 

Econ 4710: International Economic Development

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the causes of underdevelopment in the Third World.
  • Understand the role of agriculture, industry, and trade in the development process of the less developed countries.
  • Understand the extent to which economic theories may be helpful in the design of development policies in the less developed countries. 

 

Econ 4895: Workshop in Economic Research

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Learn how to quickly appreciate and critically assess cutting edge research knowledge in economics
  • Learn how to coherently pose interesting questions to speakers presenting their research
  • Gain exposure to and appreciation of a wide range of styles for the presentation of information in a seminar setting
  • Have the opportunity to experience the academic interaction among several faculty members and visiting luminaries as they discuss and debate the fine points of path-breaking new research

 

Econ 4896: Senior Research

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Define an economic problem
  • Review some relevant literature related to the problem
  • Use economic data and analysis to describe or explain the problem
  • Present a conclusion or resolution
  • Practice and display competence in the use of technology in the oral presentation of an economic argument
  • Communicate economic ideas orally and in writing, using appropriate computer technologies

 

Econ 6101: Seminar: Microeconomic Theory I 

Upon successful completion of the course sequence a student will be able to:

  • Understand all aspects of intermediate microeconomic theory (Econ 3000).
  • Have the ability to teach Principles of Microeconomics (Econ 2301).
  • Have a familiarity with the seminal literature in the field of microeconomic theory.
  • Have the economic knowledge necessary to take PhD-level economic courses grounded in microeconomic thinking without remediation.
  • Apply microeconomic theory to a variety of real-world business and public policy situations.
  • Relate economic analysis in speaking, in writing, in mathematical models and in diagrams.
  • Critically understand and analyze (correct and incorrect) economic analysis, as presented by academics, journalists, public policy makers, business leaders, and elected officials.

 

6102: Seminar: Microeconomic Theory II

Upon successful completion of the course sequence a student will be able to:

  • Understand all aspects of intermediate microeconomic theory (Econ 3000 and Econ 4000).
  • Have the ability to teach Principles of Microeconomics (Econ 2301).
  • Have a familiarity with the seminal literature in the field of microeconomic theory.
  • Have the economic knowledge necessary to take PhD-level economic courses grounded in microeconomic thinking without remediation.
  • Apply microeconomic theory to a variety of real-world business and public policy situations.
  • Relate economic analysis in speaking, in writing, and in mathematical and diagrams.
  • Critically understand and analyze (correct and incorrect) economic analysis, as presented by academics, journalists, public policy makers, business leaders, and elected officials.

 

Econ 6105: Seminar: Macroeconomic Theory

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand and forecast major interest rate swings.
  • Understand and forecast major macroeconomic trends.
  • Understand macroeconomic data, including the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, the growth rate of real GDP, interest rates, and the net change in business inventories.
  • Understand the known causes of business cycles and be able to think critically about additional causes that are not yet known.
  • Understand the determinants of long-term economic growth.
  • Understand the relationship between the government budget deficit/surplus, the national debt, and the foreign trade deficit/surplus.
  • Understand the relationship between real GDP, interest rates, international capital flows, international trade flows, and the exchange rate.

 

Econ 6106: Macroeconomics For Business

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the structure and decision-making authority of the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury, respectively.
  • Understand the factors determining gross domestic product, employment, the general level of prices and interest rates.
  • Measure living standards, inflation, and unemployment for use as economic indicators.
  • Analyze the determinants of the relative strengths of fiscal and monetary policy for affecting gross domestic product.
  • Learn the determinants of long-term economic growth, including the role of saving and investment on the rate of growth.
  • Understand the role of international trade in affecting living standards.
  • Analyze the factors that determine currency exchange rates and the impact of changes in exchange rates on exports and imports.
  • Learn to access national and international macroeconomic data.
  • Learn how to access and interpret forecasts using macroeconomic data.
  • Write a paper, of at least twenty pages, with correct grammar, spelling and construction, and that is both informative and persuasive, on an assigned topic in macroeconomics for business.

6107: Global Economic Analysis

Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Use their understanding of international trade and finance models to better identify the impact on the global operations of firms from changes in macroeconomic, international trade and investment policies.
  • Understand how interest rates, inflation rates, asset prices and exchange rates are determined and affect each other so as to use this knowledge in practical decision making.
  • Understand the workings and roles of various international economic institutions, (such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization), and how they may impact the global operation and decision making of firms.
  • Use their knowledge about financial instruments, macroeconomic policy and the mechanics of finance to develop optimal hedging, speculation, risk management, and portfolio allocation strategies.

 

Econ 6150: Economic History of the United States

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the pace and course of American economic development.
  • Understand the development of American economic institutions and policies.
  • Apply economic theory to understand the sources of American economic growth.
  • Apply economic theory to understand the economic dimensions of social and political issues in American history.

 

Econ 6200: Seminar: Comparative Economic Systems

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the nature of an economic system; varieties of economic systems.
  • Understand various possible criteria for judging the success of economic systems.
  • Understand the relationships among the concepts of “market failure,” “government failure,” property rights, transaction costs, and culture.
  • Understand the nature of anarchy and possible explanations for the emergence of government.
  • Understand the nature of minimal-state libertarianism and its assumptions about government failure; the northern United States before the American Civil War.
  • Understand the nature of classical liberalism and its assumptions about market failure and economic inequalities; capitalism and historians of the “Industrial Revolution” and the Great Depression.
  • Understand the nature of social democracy and its assumptions about the systematic effects of empowering the state to confiscate some people’s assets and incomes for the benefit of others.
  • Understand classical and modern versions of Marxism.
  • Understand the famous “calculation debate” concerning the feasibility and potential of socialism
  • Understand the assumptions of market socialism; realities of Hungary pre-1989.
  • Understand the economics of syndicalism; realities of the former Yugoslavia.
  • Understand the nature of centrally-planned economies; Mao Zedong’s China and the former Soviet Union; the relationship between economic freedom and political freedom.
  • Understand the nature of efforts to transform Russia and China.
  • Understand the dynamics of democratic, “mixed or middle-way economies”.
    • Read and interpret economic literature on economic systems.

 

Econ 6250: Seminar: Project Analysis

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the theory and practice of project evaluation.
  • Explain the conceptual basis of cost-benefit analysis.
  • Understand the tradeoffs between economic efficiency and equity.
  • Use cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis to assess a public or private project.
  • Use risk, uncertainty, and sensitivity analysis to enhance a typical project evaluation.
  • Design a simple evaluation.
  • Know the different definitions of costs (and benefits) and how their use can influence cost-benefit estimations.
  • Use statistical techniques (e.g., regression analysis) to estimate costs and biases.
  • Understand the data needs and problems associated with implementing a cost-benefit analysis.
  • Understand the role of externalities, consumer and producer surplus and public goods in assessing policy.

 

Econ 6315: Seminar: Monetary Theory

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand various concepts of money and money substitutes.
  • Understand the sources of money and money substitutes.
  • Explain and anticipate the consequences of changes in the quantity of money on such economic variables as interest rates, inflation, the exchange rate, and unemployment.
  • Apply knowledge of the seminal literature in monetary theory.

 

Econ 6370: Seminar: Public Sector Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Critically assess the current motivations for and the efficacy of government interventions in the economy.
  • Effectively communicate the essence of taxation theory, including tax incidence, tax efficiency, and tax equity.
  • Apply knowledge of the seminal literature in the areas of public goods, externalities, public choice, and taxation.
  • Critically analyze alternative taxation schemes.

 

Econ 6400: Seminar: Econometrics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand how to analyze economic data.
  • Understand the statistical tools economists use in empirical research.
  • Understand the assumptions underlying the statistical tools economists use and the consequences of violating those assumptions.
  • Apply the statistical tools that economists use to analyze data.
  • Understand existing data available for empirical research in economics.

 

Econ 6520: Seminar: Industrial Organization

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Explain the seminal literature in industrial organization.
  • Critically assess the efficacy of past and current industrial policy.
  • Evaluate the structure, conduct, performance paradigm and its shortcomings and extension.
  • Integrate various theories, problems, and perspectives to begin the process of developing an innovative research agenda.

 

Econ 6680: Seminar: Labor Economics

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Explain labor market operations using different theories within labor economics.
  • Explain labor market trends using data about the labor market.
  • Explain labor supply for an individual and society.
  • Augment neoclassical labor supply using the theory of allocation of time.
  • Explain returns to schooling, on the job training, migration, employer-sponsored health care, and education using human capital theory.
  • Explain labor demand for firms operating in competitive and monopolistic markets using marginal productivity theory.
  • Understand wage and employment in bilateral monopolies and perfect competition.
  • Explain wage schemes and structures within firms using “personnel economics”.
  • Understand the historical and present day impact of unions on labor market operations.
  • Explain a variety of constraints on labor mobility and operations (e.g., policies, labor institutions, job search).
  • Read and critique the literature in a specific topic area in labor economics.

 

Econ 6700: Seminar: International Trade

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the various reasons why countries engage in international trade, including the direction and volume of trade between nations.
  • Use models of trade to demonstrate the overall gains from trading as well as the effects on income distribution within countries due to trade with foreign nations.
    • Understand how international factor mobility affects an economy.
    • Analyze current issues and policies using the concepts of international trade theory.
  • Understand the role key international institutions play in affecting trade flows across the world.

 

Econ 6710: Seminar: Economic Development

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the causes of underdevelopment in the Third World.
  • Understand the role of agriculture, industry, and trade in the development process of the less developed countries.
  • Understand the extent to which economic theories may be helpful in the design of development policies in the less developed countries. 
  • Write an informative and persuasive paper of approximately 20 pages, with correct spelling, grammar, and construction in an area of international economic development.

 

Econ 6896: Research Methods

Upon successful completion of the course a student will be able to:

  • Understand the difference between an hypothesis and a problem statement.
  • Determine whether an hypotheses or problem statement is testable.
  • Define and operationalize a variable.
  • Understand the relationship between a concept and variable.
  • Understand the difference between causation and correlation.
  • Understand the difference between a population and sample.
  • Understand the elements of a good research design, its purpose, and its relationship to the hypothesis/problem statement.
  • Understand the difference between random assignment and random sampling.
  • Distinguish between experimental and nonexperimental designs.
  • Understand validity and sampling concerns in research design.
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary data and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • Understand the alternative levels of measurement available for data collection and select the appropriate level.
  • Prepare data for analysis.
  • Know how to report research results.
  • Critically evaluate research proposed or performed by others.
  • Understand ethical issues arise in conducting economic research and strategies for resolving them.
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