Faculty Profiles

Photo of Linda Ivey

Linda L. Ivey (2006), Associate Professor, Public History Coordinator and Department Chair
B.A., Trinity College (CT), Ph.D., Georgetown University
linda.ivey@csueastbay.edu

Professor Ivey specializes in environmental history, looking at the intersections of this field with cultural, ethnic and labor history.  She completed her doctoral work on the ecological and social consequences of capitalist agriculture on the Central Coast of California, and is currently working on a book that explores the links among the changing environment, immigration, and class conflict in that region in the early 20th century.  She is the author of "Ethnicity in the Land: Lost Stories in California Agriculture" which appeared in Agricultural History in 2007, and has published smaller pieces in Environmental History and Reviews in American History.  Professor Ivey is the coordinator of the Public History program at CSU East Bay and works with local museums and historical institutions to offer student internships and link student work to public venues. She teaches courses in the history of California and the West, as well as in environmental, immigration, and public history.

Photo of Dee Andrews

Dee E. Andrews (1987), Professor 
B.A., Bennington College, M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
dee.andrews@csueastbay.edu

Professor Andrews specializes in the history of early America and the new republic, with emphases on religion, antislavery, and the history of the book.  Prof. Andrews has been recipient a Faculty Fellowship with the Pew Program in Religion and American History and grants from the Gilder-Lehrman Fellowship Foundation, the American Philosophical Society, and the Bibliographical Society of America among others. Her work includes The Methodists and Revolutionary America, published in 2000 by Princeton University Press and awarded the 2001 Hans Rosenhaupt Memorial Book Award by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, as well as numerous articles, reviews, and review essays. She has served as an advisor with the Humanities West program on Benjamin Franklin and as Content Coordinator for Words That Made America, a federal Teaching American History grant with Alameda County Office of Education. Most recently she attended the ever-popular Rare Book School at the University of Virginia to study early American printing and publishing. She proudly teaches the U.S. History survey and upper division courses on early America, historical writing, and historical research methods.

Photo of Bridget Ford

Bridget Ford (2006), Associate Professor and Social Science Single Subject Preparation Advisor
B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University, Ph.D., University of California, Davis
bridget.ford@csueastbay.edu

Inspired by her mother, a historian who also earned her Ph.D. from UC Davis, and her father, a devoted reader of history, Professor Ford pursued a career that would allow her to study the past. Her research brings the insights of cultural history to the study of the Civil War era in the United States. Her book, American Crossings: Forging Union in a Civil War Borderland, is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. In 2002-03, she received a Mellon Post-Dissertation Fellowship for research at the American Antiquarian Society in Massachusetts. Her scholarship has also been supported by the Center for Religion and American Life at Yale University, the Huntington Library in San Marino, the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College, and the American Historical Association. Under the auspices of a Teaching American History grant, Dr. Ford has directed a program for professional development of K-12 History/ Social Science teachers. At CSU East Bay, she teaches courses on the early republic and Civil War among other subjects in 19th-century American history. Dr. Ford is currently the Director of the University Honors Program.

Vahid Fozdar (2005), Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
vahid.fozdar@csueastbay.edu

Professor Fozdar is a historian of modern South Asia and colonialism.  He completed his doctoral work on the role of Freemasons in the British Empire in India and in the Indian nationalist movement.  Professor Fozdar's article, Imperial Brothers, Imperial Partners:  Indian Freemasons, Race, Kinship, and Networking in the British Empire and Beyond, was published as a chapter in the anthology, Decentering Empire:  Britain, India, and the Transcolonial World (Orient Longman Press, 2006).  Another article, That Grand Primeval and Fundamental Religion:  The Transformation of Freemasonry into an Imperial Cult, has been accepted for publication by the Journal of World History.  Professor Fozdar's other areas of scholarly interest include the history of the Islamic world, world history, and comparative religions.  He is currently teaching the department's courses in the history of South Asia, the Middle East, and the modern world. Dr. Fozdar is on sabbatical for the 2013-2014 academic year.

Photo of Richard Garcia

Richard A. Garcia (1990), Professor
B.A. and M.A., University of Texas, M.A. and Ph.D. University of California, Irvine
richard.garcia@csueastbay.edu

Professor Garcia joined the History Department after teaching in Cal State East Bay's Department of Ethnic Studies. Prof. Garcia is an American intellectual and cultural historian with a teaching and publishing emphasis on Mexican American History and Mexican American/Latino Cultural Studies. His other areas of interest are Ethnic History, Southwest and California History, History and Theory, Biography, and American Cultural Studies. Prof. Garcia is author of numerous books, including The Chicanos in America, 1540-1974 (1977),Political Ideology: A Comparative Study of Three Chicano Groups (1977), Rise of the Mexican American Middle Class: San Antonio, 1929-1941 (1991), the award-winning Cesar Chavez: A Triumph of Spirit (1995),  Notable Latino Americans (1997) which won a CHOICE outstanding book award for 1997, Ethnic Community Builders: Mexican Americans in Search of Justice and Power (2007) and the soon-to-be-published Mexican Americans: Essays of History, Culture & Thought. He was also the co-editor of Race and Class (2001), and the consulting editor for California History, Special Issue on Mexican Americans in California (1995).  He is also the author of several articles, including "Religion as Language, Church as Culture: Changing Chicano Historiography" in Reviews in American History 34, no. 4 (Dec 2006), and has presented research at numerous professional conferences in several countries.

Photo of Robert Phelps

Robert A. Phelps (1998), Associate Professor and Director, Concord Campus
B.A., San Diego State University, M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Riverside
robert.phelps@csueastbay.edu

Another graduate of the California State University, Professor Phelps teaches courses in the History of California, the American West, the Progressive Era, and the Great Depression/World War 2. His overview of the development of California's Gold Rush urban system appeared in Richard Orsi and Kevin Starr's Rooted in Barbarous Soil: California During the Gold Rush, and his study of Henry Huntington's factory town of Dolgeville won the Doyce B. Nunis Award for the best article on the history of Southern California. Other publications include two photographic histories published by Arcadia Press, and a study of military tactics during California's Mexican Era, which appeared in the journal California History. His current research includes an analysis of urban planning in the Los Angeles area in the early 20th century, centering on the model industrial city of Torrance, California.  Prof. Phelps has also served as the primary advisor for the Hayward Area Historical Society's "Crossroads" online history of the East Bay, and he is currently working as the content specialist for the Oakland Museum of California's on-line photographic exhibit, entitled Picture This. He is a past recipient of the Concord Campus' "Professor of the Year" award, and is the current director of CSU East Bay's University Honors Program. In the fall of 2013, Prof. Phelps will begin an appointment as the Director of the Concord campus.

Photo of Khal Schneider

Khal Schneider (2006), Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator
B.A., University of Minnesota, M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley.
khal.schneider@csueastbay.edu

Professor Schneider's research specialty is American Indian history.  He is currently working on a book-length manuscript based on his dissertation, Citizen Lives: California Indian Country, 1855-1940.  Drawn from research in local and federal archives, and paying close attention to state and local challenges to federal authority, the book will explain how Pomo communities in Northern California, caught between the often conflicting authority of local land owners and the federal government, used their ambiguous legal status to re-create community land holdings.  He teaches classes in the history of California, the American West, American Indian history, and other offerings in late 19th- and early 20th-century U.S. history.

Photo of Nancy Thompson

Nancy M. Thompson (1999), Associate Professor and Director, Liberal Studies Program
B.A. and M.A., CSU Fresno, Ph.D., Stanford University
nancy.thompson@csueastbay.edu

Professor Thompson's main research interest is in early medieval religion, with emphasis on the sermons of Anglo-Saxon England. Her recent articles include "The Carolingian De festivitatibus and the Blickling Book, which appeared in Aaron Kleist, ed., Precedence, Practice and Appropriation: The Old English Homily (Brepols); and  Anglo-Saxon Orthodoxy,   which was published in the collection of essays, Old English Literature in Its Manuscript Context. She has been the recipient of an NEH Fellowship at Cambridge University, participates regularly in Medieval history conferences, and is currently working on a book on preaching and pastoral care in the early Middle Ages. Prof. Thompson teaches the first part of the World Civilizations survey and courses in Medieval Europe, Ancient History, and Historiography. Her 3010 seminar focuses on Europe in the Plague Years. Her greatest claim to fame is her ability to read half a dozen languages, several of them dead. She also serves as editor of the History Department's Newsletter.

Photo of Jessica Weiss

Jessica Weiss (1999), Professor and Director, Faculty Development.
B.A., M.A., and PhD., University of California, Berkeley
jessica.weiss@csueastbay.edu

Professor Weiss teaches courses in the history of women in America, the history of the American family, and Cold War America. Her book, To Have and To Hold: Marriage, the Baby Boom, and Social Change, was published by University of Chicago Press in 2000 and received the 2001 Sierra Prize for best book from the Western Association of Women Historians. Her article, “’Don’t Knock Motherhood:’ Attitudes Toward Domesticity and Feminism in Responses to Friedan’s “Fraud of Femininity” was published in Kathleen Donohue’s edited collection, Liberty and Justice for All?: Rethinking Politics in Cold War America (2012) and excerpted in the new Norton critical edition of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique (2013). Her current research explores responses to the modern feminist movement from the 1950s to the 1980s. Prof. Weiss is currently Director of Faculty Development and the Faculty Center for Excellence in Teaching.

Emeritus Teaching Faculty

Photo of Henry Reichman

Henry F. Reichman (1989), Professor Emeritus
A.B., Columbia University, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
henry.reichman@csueastbay.edu

Professor Reichman specializes in the history of Russia/USSR and European history since 1789. An avid baseball fan, he also teaches a course in the history of baseball. Prof. Reichman has a distinguished record in university governance, including as Chair of the Academic Senate and Statewide Academic Senator. He received the CSUEB Outstanding Professor Award in 1999 and is currently listed in Who's Who Among America's Teachers. Prof. Reichman is the author of numerous articles and conference presentations. His book, Railwaymen and Revolution: Russia, 1905, was published in 1987 by University of California Press. He is Associate Editor of the American Library Association's Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom and author of Censorship and Selection: Issues and Answers for Schools, the 3rd edition of which was published in 2001.

Staff

Department Staff aim to support students in their educational goals. Students should feel free to consult with the staff regarding general information relating to faculty office hours, course registration, procedures for graduation, and the American Institutions requirement.

Wanda Washington(1998)
Administrative Support Coordinator
510-885-3207
wanda.washington@csueastbay.edu

Annual Lecturers

Roger Baldwin
B.A., University of Texas, Austin; M.A., University of California, Berkeley

Roger Baldwin specializes in modern U.S. history. His research interests are in science and religion in 1920s. He has extensive teaching experience in a wide variety of fields in American history, including seminars at the University of California, Berkeley. At Cal State East Bay he has taught the U.S. history survey and recent U.S. history.

Jeffrey M. Burns
B.A., University of California, Riverside; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame

Dr. Burns teaches courses in California and U.S. History and is currently archivist of the Archdiocese of San Francisco. He has published widely in local, immigration, and religious history and received one of the Catholic Press Association's annual journalism awards. His most recent publication is Journey of Hope, 1945-2000: A History of the Archdiocese of San Francisco (2000).

Gregory J. Brueck (gregory.brueck@csueastbay.edu)
Ph.D, California, Davis
American West

Susan Hogue (susan.hogue@csueastbay.edu)
MA, University of California, Davis
Latin America, World

Mary Ann Irwin (maryann.irwin@csueastbay.edu)
MA, San Francisco State
California, Gender

Kevin W. Kaatz (kevin.kaatz@csueastbay.edu)
Ph.D, Macquarie, Australia
Ancient World

Richard J. Kim (richard.kim@csueastbay.edu)
Ph.D, California, Berkeley
Modern Europe, World

Karen Pare  (karen.pare@csueastbay.edu)
MA, Rutgers University
US, Gender, History of Nursing

Nancy Park  (nancy.park@csueastbay.edu)
Ph.D, Harvard
China, Japan

Richard M. Speed (richard.speed@csueastbay.edu)
Ph.D, California, Santa Barbara
US Diplomatic

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