Christopher Kitting

NS 302, 510-885-3001
chris.kitting@csueastbay.edu

Class Information
Class Number Section Days Room Number Times
3130 1 TTh SC-N220 4 - 5:50 pm
6801 1 W SC-S149
5 - 7:30 pm

With a Biological Sciences B. Sci. from U.C. Irvine then a Stanford University full doctoral fellowship, I came to the Hayward Hills Campus after postdoctoral research then teaching at UC Santa Barbara then University of Texas at Austin. I am associate editor of Migration: Mechanisms and Adaptive Significance. I have published over 25 other scientific articles, and made numerous formal presentations to scientific conferences. My multidisciplinary research program in our CSUEB Shore Lab is determining the natural importance and suitable conservation and restoration of shoreline communities, particularly on San Francisco Bay and Delta Shores with sea grass and marsh plant communities. My students and I seek to identify particular, major limitations on historical and restored communities as major determinants of population distributions and abundances, as regions are threatened, conserved, or restored to higher abundances of natural plants and animals.

Publications:

  1. Kitting, and C.C. Ouverney. 2004. Field bioassays with common fishes and invertebrate food resources near constructed and reclaimed water marshes on San Francisco Estuary. Proceedings of the American Fisheries Society, and paper in Symposium Book on Fish Toxicity Interactions, Edited by C. Wood, K. Sloman, and D. MacKindlay pp 339-350. International Congress, American Fisheries Society, Manaus, Brazil www.fishbiologycongress.org)
  2. Kitting and C.L. Davis. 2003. Distributions of Unusual Hydrobiid Snails among Restored and Reference Brackish Marshes of San Francisco Bay Estuary, versus lagoons north and south on the Central California Coast. West. Soc. Malacol. Ann. Report 42: 23-27.
  3. Rees, J. and Kitting. 2002. “Survey of Gelatinous Zooplankton (“Jellyfish”) in the San Francisco Estuary: Initial Field Survey, Annotated Species Checklist, and Illustrated Field Key.” Calif. Interagency Ecological Program Technical Report 40. 48 pp.
  4. Davis, C.L. and Kitting, 2002. Recruitment and abundance of unusual hydrobiid snails among restored and reference brackish marshes of San Francisco Bay Estuary. Western Society of Malacologists Annual Report 35: 7-10.
  5. Kitting, C.L. 2001. Pulmonate Mollusca persisting in California Delta marshes with high tidal and physical/chemical extremes. Western Society of Malacologists Annual Report Vol. 33.
  6. Rees, J.T. and C.L. Kitting. 1999. Pilot survey of gelatinous zooplankton in the San Francisco Estuary. Interagency Ecological Program Newsletter (and web site) 12(3): 4-5.
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