Office of Faculty Development

Diversity

Agin, Rhoda L., Sterling Sakai, Colleen Fong, and Asoke Basu.

Guide to the Pronunciation of Asian Pacific Names. Hayward, Calif.: Asian American Educators' Council, 1993. (40 pp.)
CSUH Library-CS2950 .G85 1993 CSUH-FCET Library (many copies)

Written by professors at California State University, East Bay, this little primer sets out to do precisely what its title indicates: guide the reader in the pronunciation of Asian Pacific names. In addition to covering pronunciation, the authors address cultural expectations regarding the use of names in greetings and addressing one another. Countries covered (including historical briefs) are Afghanistan, Cambodia, China, Philippines, and Vietnam. One index chart of all the names covered leads off the booklet and demographic statistics and a list of resources close it. Originally designed to serve the university campus, the book has usefulness in the corporate world as well.

Aguirre, Jr., Adalberto, and Ruben O. Martinez.

Chicanos in Higher Education: Issues and Dilemmas for the 21st Century. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development, 1993. (108 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC2683.6 .A35 1993 CSUH-FCET Library

Noting the indicators of access, participation, and faculty representation in higher education by Chicanos, this volume proposes that the social and cultural isolation of Chicanos in American schools has led to an educational crisis for them. The authors assert that educational attainment is the necessary route for Chicanos to have an integrative place in American culture.

Asian Pacific American Education Advisory Committee.

Asian Pacific Americans in the CSU: A Follow-up Report. Long Beach, Calif.: Office of the Chancellor, The California State University, 1994. (45 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This report reviews the progress of the various campuses of the California State University in implementing the recommendations of the committee's 1990 report on Asian Pacific Americans in the CSU (a summary of which is included here in Appendix B). By the date of this report, little progress had been made.

Astone, Barbara, and Elsa Nuñez-Wormack.

Pursuing Diversity: Recruiting College Minority Students. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 7. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development, 1990. (130 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC3731 .A84 1990 CSUH—FCET Library

This brief volume covers the demographic issues regarding minority student populations and the educational needs related to the demographic growth. It argues for educational institutions to take proactive roles in the quest for social change to better address the needs. As the title clearly shows, the authors focus specifically on student recruitment issues, including admissions, financial aid, retention, and transfer.

Bolick, Clint, and Susan Nestleroth.

Opportunity 2000: Creative Affirmative Action Strategies for a Changing Workforce. Prepared for the Employment Standards Administration , U.S. Department of Labor. Indianapolis, Ind.: Hudson Institute, 1988. (181 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

After 1987 studies projected where the then-current trends would take the American workforce and workplace, this 1988 study was commissioned "to describe and analyze new, experimental, or emerging strategies" for meeting the challenges of assuring equal opportunity employment. Chapters covering specific people groups are work and families, minorities and the economically disadvantaged, disabled workers, older workers, and veterans. A final chapter proposes attitudinal, structural, and programmatic changes as parts of a human resources approach to affirmative action.

Bowser, Benjamin P., Gale S. Auletta, and Terry Jones.

Confronting Diversity Issues on Campus. Survival Skills for Scholars, 6. Newbury Park, Calif.: SAGE, 1993. (102 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC1099.3 .B69 1993 CSUH-FCET Library

Believing that awareness of the racial divide and of interpersonal differences makes it more possible to address the problems and move toward solutions, the authors identify ways in which people in education-and the education culture-contribute to the racial divide. In offering solutions for creating more inclusive institutions, they address the issues of racial identity and communication about diversity. After addressing diversity issues somewhat unique to education (the purpose of education, affirmative action, freedom of speech, and the role of ethnic studies), they introduce the idea of "communities of interest" as offering a framework for successfully approaching the matter of diversity.

Bowser, Benjamin P., Gale S. Auletta, and Terry Jones, eds.

Toward the Multicultural University. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1995. (195 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC1099.3 .T68 1995 CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of articles, inspired by two national conferences held in 1989 and 1991 (both sponsored by the Center for the Study of Intercultural Relations and the Extension Division at California State University, Hayward), calls for the end of Eurocentric dominance in higher education. A truly multicultural university would be where a student would study her own culture, history, and literature in depth and at least two others-one domestic and one international. The book is structure around four themes: the forces making for the multicultural challenge (chapters 1-3), America's cultural diversity (chapters 4-6), and proposals and models for an inclusive, multicultural university (chapters 7-11).

Kramer, Martin, and Stephen S. Weiner.

Dialogues for Diversity: Community and Ethnicity on Campus. The Project on Campus Community and Diversity of the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. American Council on Education Series on Higher Education. Phoenix, Ariz.: Oryx, 1994. (161 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC3727 .O64 1994 CSUH-FCET Library

"This is not yet another book arguing the case or acknowledging the importance of ethnic diversity for the future of American higher education. . . . These materials are, rather, intended to help groups of individuals on campus toward focused discussions of the role of ethnic diversity in the daily life of colleges and universities. The aim is to help such groups to find their own common ground, not to tell them what that common ground should be" (p. xi). With this stated purpose, the volume takes a workbook posture using a case-study approach to fostering discussions of diversity issues. Topics covered are mission and diversity, the social context, diversity and quality, community and campus climate, student development and ethnic identity, the faculty role, and leadership for diversity. A final section (pp. 136-58) offers suggestions (about time, place, format, ground rules, and selection of materials) for conducting such discussions on diversity.

Morrison, Ann M.

The New Leaders: Guidelines on Leadership Diversity in America. The Jossey-Bass Management Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992. (317 pp.)
CSUH Library-HD38.2 .M67 1992 CSUH-FCET Library

Morrison attempts to provide in this volume what many other books have failed to provide: a broad-based framework for diversity efforts with relevant recommendations for all gender and ethnic groups. The intent is to give organizations and their leaders "a solid basis for analyzing and selecting options for developing diversity practices" (p. ii). She covers the benefits and challenges of striving for diversity, practices used to foster diversity, and a five-step process for developing a diversity plan.

Pickert, Sarah M.

Preparing for a Global Community: Achieving an International Perspective in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 2. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, 1992. (94 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC1090 .P5 1992 CSUH-FCET Library

This report summarizes the efforts American higher education has been making to meet the challenge of graduating citizens prepared to function professionally and personally in the international society our world has become. After discussing what already has been accomplished in terms of reforming curriculum, mobilizing student participation, and administering international education, Pickert briefly offers suggestions for further advances.

Rabitoy, Neil.

Cross-Cultural Perspectives in the Curriculum. Academic Challenges. Long Beach, Calif.: Academic Program Improvement, 1990. (22 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC1099.3 .C7 1990 CSUH-FCET Library

This brief pamphlet reports on the thirteen Academic Program Improvement grant funded projects undertaken in the 1980's on California State University campuses regarding constructing university-level curriculum for a society of diverse cultures. It covers the background, summarizes the projects, evaluates them, and offers some concluding observations.

Rabitoy, Neil.

Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering. Academic Challenges. Long Beach, Calif.: Academic Program Improvement, 1990. (25 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This brief pamphlet reports on the seventeen Academic Program Improvement grant funded projects undertaken between 1975 and 1987 on California State University campuses regarding the recruitment and retention and faculty advising of women and minority students in science and engineering. It covers the background, summarizes the projects, and offers some concluding observations.

Rhoads, Robert A. and William G. Tierney.

Cultural Leadership in Higher Education. University Park, Penn.: National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, 1992. (59 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Rhoads and Tierney claim that solutions to university problems related to diversity "are best developed when administrators closely examine the values, beliefs, traditions, and histories that organizational members hold" (p. 1). Based on research, they assert eight principles for effective academic leadership in changing an institutional culture.

Richardson, Jr., Richard C., and Elizabeth Fisk Skinner.

Achieving Quality and Diversity: Universities in a Multicultural Society. American Council on Education/Macmillan Series on Higher Education. New York: ACE/Macmillan, 1991. (271 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC3727 .R52 1991 CSUH-FCET Library

Believing that policy decisions in the 1960's fostered an educational environment that accepts a false dichotomy between quality and diversity, Richardson and Skinner propose that this wrong assumption be challenged. Every institution must accept responsibility for both quality and diversity. The authors present a model for college-level minority participation and achievement in chapters 1-3 and offer ten supporting case studies in chapters 4-13. The volume ends with a chapter of suggestions for affecting public education policy.

Roberts, Helen, Juan C. Gonzales, Olita D. Harris, Delores J. Huff, Ann M. Johns, Ray Lou, and Otis L. Scott.

Teaching from a Multicultural Perspective. Survival Skills for Scholars, 12. Newbury Park, Calif.: SAGE, 1994. (113 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of essays (by CSU faculty) introduces new developments in approaching diversity in college teaching and learning. The issues addressed include classroom strategies, curriculum reforms, assessment tools, and mentoring ideas. A student profile questionnaire for San Diego State University is included in an appendix.

Smith, Daryl G.

The Challenge of Diversity: Involvement or Alienation in the Academy? ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 5. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development, 1989. (115 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC208.8 .S64 1989 CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of essays (by CSU faculty) introduces new developments in approaching diversity in college teaching and learning. The issues addressed include classroom strategies, curriculum reforms, assessment tools, and mentoring ideas. A student profile questionnaire for San Diego State University is included in an appendix.

Smith, Daryl G., et al.

Achieving Faculty Diversity: Debunking the Myths. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities, 1996. (151 pp.)
CSUH Library-LB2332.72 .S65 1996 CSUH-FCET Library

This volume publishes the results of interviews regarding the hiring experiences of 298 new faculty members from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and in a variety of discipline fields. The authors claim they can debunk, to some degree, these six myths prevalent in the academic labor market: 1) few qualified faculty of color in the pipeline results in institutions competing over them, 2) scarcity of faculty of color in the sciences means those that are available are in high demand, 3) faculty of color are only interested in jobs at the most prestigious institutions making it difficult for others to recruit them, 4) wealthy and prestigious institutions often steal faculty of color away from other institutions, 5) faculty of color are leaving academia for more lucrative careers in business and/or government, and 6) institutions are so focused on diversifying faculty that heterosexual white males have no chance. They offer other conclusions of the study and suggest several implications, including some principles of good practice.

Tierney, William G.

Building Communities of Difference: Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century. Critical Studies in Education and Culture Series. Westport, Conn.: Bergin & Garvey, 1993. (167 pp.)
CSUH Library- LA227.4 .T54 1993 CSUH-FCET Library

Tierney argues that higher education's central challenge is a more of a moral issue regarding how people of differing backgrounds interact rather than fiscal and structural problems. From a platform of both postmodernism and critical theory, Tierney uses ethnographic case studies to define some of higher education's problems and offers solutions to them in that light. His suggestions point away from individualism and competitive models and toward building universities into more accepting democratic communities.

Weimer, Maryellen, et al.

Teaching Students At-Risk: An Annotated Bibliography for Faculty. University Park, Penn.: National Center on Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, 1993. (19 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

While recognizing that students from underrepresented groups are not the only at-risks students, this bibliography nevertheless focuses on the question of how to increase the presence and improve the success of underrepresented groups in college. The listing is intended for faculty who teach courses typically populated with these underrepresented students. The broad categories in the taxonomy of the bibliography include research related to students at-risk, understanding special populations, instructional needs of students at-risk, and general information.

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