Office of Faculty Development

Teaching and Learning

general | active learning | cooperative learning | learning communities | service learning | technology | writing

GENERAL

Chaffee, Ellen Earle, and Lawrence A. Sherr.

Quality: Transforming Postsecondary Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development, 1992. (126 pp.)
CSUH Library-LB2341 .C468 1992 CSUH-FCET Library

To response to public distrust of college education and its cost, many universities have adopted the Total Quality Management (TQM) approach from the business world. The fundamental principles of TQM—improve quality, increase productivity, decrease cost—have transformational significance for educational institutions. The idea of quality entails not only output (e.g., noted by outcomes assessment) and design (e.g., noted in program curriculum), but also process. In education, the quality of inputs and outputs get attention while the quality of process tends to get neglected. An institution is a collection of processes and the first step to improving a process is to reckon with why it exists. TQM principles for process improvement include such ideas as: decisions are made with data, details affect the process which affects the product, processes have inherent problems not attributable to the workers, more complexity provides for more problems-making a process as simple as possible improves quality. Improving quality is itself a process, often referred to as the "Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle" (or "PDCA cycle").

Administration in a TQM oriented institution takes on a noticeable character. The primary job of administration is to remove barriers so as to free people to achieve better quality. It is most helpful to first examine the process (not the people) as the likely location for problems affecting quality. The people involved in working the process are probably most knowledgeable about its needed improvements and administration must entrust them and empower them to do so. Cooperation, initiative, and continuous improvement are values for all members.

Faculty in a TQM environment must wrestle with the extent to which and ways in which the educational enterprise can become more productively process oriented. There are curriculum implications and the evaluation of students (as well as the faculty themselves) would be affected.

Daloz, Laurent A.

Effective Teaching and Mentoring: Realizing the Transformational Power of Adult Learning Experiences. The Jossey-Bass Higher Education Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1986. (256 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Winner of the 1987 Frandson Award given by the National University Continuing Education Association, this book is about how understanding adult development can help professors improve the quality of their educational experience. Neither a textbook nor a technical manual, the volume is nevertheless potentially helpful not only to professors of adult learners but to anyone working to provide for their educational success (e.g., student affairs officers, administrators, and mentors). While explicitly addressing adult education, the ideas presented certainly apply to a mentoring-teaching approach with more traditional aged college students as well. Some of the major themes include: listen to your students' stories, view yourself as a guide, plan your meetings and classes to promote development, turn to and gather together those who share your concerns, recognize that in part your growth depends upon your students.

Evans, Nancy, Deanna S. Forney, and Florence Guido-DiBrito.

Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998. (348 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This book is designed specifically to assist student affairs professionals in understanding the developmental challenges (mental, emotional, and behavioral) faced by today's college students. The book is comprehensive, including definitions of student development, a brief history of the movement, overviews and in-depth analyses of various developmental theories (psychosocial, cognitive-structural, and typological), and discussion of using theories in combination. Frequent anecdotes help keep the theoretical material anchored in real life.

Finkel, Donald L.

Teaching with Your Mouth Shut. Portsmouth, N.H.: Boynton/Cook, 2000. (180 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

In contrast to the traditional great teacher image of the eloquent speaker dispensing knowledge via passionate oratory, Finkel presents a broader view of good teaching. After the introductory chapter and before the concluding chapter, each of this book's seven central chapters shares a different model of teaching and together they yield a democratic approach to the teaching/learning experience. The models treated are reading, discussing, inquiry-centered teaching, writing, experiencing (conceptual workshops), refusing to provide all the answers, and team-teaching. The subtitle of the concluding chapter summarizes the book's title with these four words: "Providing Experience, Provoking Reflection." In one whole sentence, "Teaching with your mouth shut entails (a) avoiding the natural temptation to teach through Telling, and (b) providing students with instructive experiences and then provoking them to reflect on those experiences" (p. 162).

Jones, Dionne J., and Betty Collier Watson.

"High-risk" Students in Higher Education: Future Trends. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development, 1990. (120 pp.)
CSUH Library- LC148 .J66 1990 CSUH-FCET Library

Defining "high-risk" students as minorities, the academically disadvantaged, the disabled, and those of low socio-economic status, Jones and Watson distinguish them from "non-traditional" students. They analyze the impact of high-risk students on academia and society and discuss the factors-academic and nonacademic-associated with risk and attrition. Finally, they outline strategies for achieving success with high-risk students.

Katz, Joseph, and Mildred Henry.

Turning Professors into Teachers: A New Approach to Faculty Development and Student Learning. The American Council on Education Series on Higher Education. Phoenix: Oryx, 1993. (173 pp.)
CSUH Library-LB2331 .K32 1988 CSUH-FCET Library

Two research projects involving fifteen institutions and conducted between 1978 and 1987 provided the raw data with which Katz and Henry have created a new model of faculty development that is designed to increase student learning. This volume presents the model (and the need for it), the methods by which they arrived at it (and samples of the data), and a challenge for professors to consider being the kinds of teachers (and not mere researcher-scholars) that students need. The model of faculty development and student learning espoused here is “inquiry-oriented” whereby faculty members adopt a learning attitude toward their own courses. They regular investigate the learning that is taking place in their classrooms by such means as a colleague regularly visiting the faculty member’s class and regularly interviewing several students about the class. Other learning inquiries can be made via tests and papers submitted by the students. Such means help the faculty member learn in an ongoing and more immediate way about the student learning that is happening in a particular course, allows the faculty member to make corrections to the teaching/learning process, and makes the whole enterprise more effective for both teacher and student.

Magnan, Robert, comp. and ed.

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Professors. Madison, Wisc.: Magna, 1990. (46 pp.)
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Magnan has gleaned these ideas primarily from issues of The Teaching Professor, a newsletter published by Magna Publications. The tips are organized under such categories as class organization, the first day, physicality, lecturing as a performing art, teaching your students to think, large lectures, discussion, group projects, motivating your students to read, work with your colleagues, and evaluating your students.

Paul, Richard, and Linda Elder.

A Miniature Guide for Students on How to Study and Learn a Discipline Using Critical Thinking Concepts and Tools. The Miniature Guide Series. Dillon Beach, Calif.: The Foundation for Critical Thinking, 2001. (48 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This pamphlet gives suggestions to help students maximize their learning performance through a more disciplined and thoughtful approach to learning. It is not about how to memorize tidbits for better test scores. While recognizing the uniqueness of each academic field (and even discussing some examples), Paul and Elder see all fields of study as sharing some common intellectual structures making such a study guide possible. They cover such things as person disciplines, how to think about ideas, analyzing articles and textbook chapters, asking questions, and understanding intellectual standards. Although the work is directed to students, the first sentence of the preface explicitly mentions that administrators and faculty can also benefit from a reminder of what disciplined academic study is all about.

Ratcliff, James L., and Associates.

Realizing the Potential: Improving Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment. University Park, Penn.: The National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, 1995. (44 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This report—prepared for the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Institute on Postsecondary Education, Libraries, and Lifelong Learning—asserts that "colleges and universities can do a great deal more to improve and enhance their impact on students” (p. v). In a brief format it examines some of the problems, promising programs, and points of practice for promoting progress.

Ryan, Kevin, and James M. Cooper.

Those Who Can, Teach. 7th ed. with Cathleen Kinsella Stutz and Susan M. Tauer: Instructor's Resource Manual with Test Items. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995. (469 pp.)
CSUH Library-LB1025.2 .R9 CSUH-FCET Library

This is the teacher's version of a text for introduction to education courses. Chapters deal with such things as teacher motivation, teaching effectiveness, philosophical foundations, American education history, ethical and legal issues, school governance, social issues, and the teaching career. As the instructor's edition, answers to the test questions are provided.

Weimer, Maryellen, et al.

Teaching Students At-Risk: An Annotated Bibliography for Faculty. University Park, Penn.: National Center on Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, 1993. (19 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

While recognizing that students from underrepresented groups are not the only at-risks students, this bibliography nevertheless focuses on the question of how to increase the presence and improve the success of underrepresented groups in college. The listing is intended for faculty who teach courses typically populated with these underrepresented students. The broad categories in the taxonomy of the bibliography include research related to students at-risk, understanding special populations, instructional needs of students at-risk, and general information.

Wheeler, Gary S., ed.

Teaching and Learning in College: A Resource for Educators. 4th ed. Elyria, Ohio: Info-Tec, 2002. (211 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of articles updates the earlier edition and continues the ongoing discussion about teaching and learning. Six leading educators deal with these subjects: the role of community in learning, diversity and new roles for faculty developers, computing the value of teaching dialogues, teaching and learning in different academic settings, teaching and learning as a transactional process, and using assessment effectively.

ACTIVE LEARNING

Bean, John C.

Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996. (282 pp.)
CSUH Library-PE1404 .B35 1996 CSUH-FCET Library

With the goal of assisting the transformation of students in any discipline from passive to active learners, this volume attempts to integrate the benefits of the writing-across-the-curriculum and the critical thinking movements of recent years. Bean offers detailed, practical suggestions but with flexibility, assuming there is not just one right way to integrate writing and critical thinking. While not assuming that writing is the only way to present critical thinking problems to students, Bean focuses on well-designed writing assignments as the best approach and offers a wide variety of useful writing methodologies. Seeing "the design of interesting problems to think about" as one of the teacher's main tasks (p. xi), Bean intends this volume for busy college professors in any academic field and aims the book "primarily at improving students' engagement with disciplinary subject matter and not at improving student writing" (p. xiv). Chapter 1 is a twelve-page overview of the whole book. It outlines seven steps for integrating writing and critical thinking activities into a course and offers responses to four misconceptions that discourage professors from utilizing such integrating activities. With more depth, the rest of the book examines the theoretical background issues (part 1), focuses on the design of both formal and informal problem-base assignments (part 2), presents a wide variety of strategies for coaching students in these endeavors (part 3), and suggests strategies for reading and grading student writings.

Boud, David, and Grahame Feletti, eds.

The Challenge of Problem-Based Learning. 2d ed. London: Kogan Page, 1997. (344 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Almost fifty contributors lend their voices in this thirty-three-chapter treatment of problem-based learning. Described by some as "the most significant innovation in education for the professions for many years" (p. 1), problem-based learning confronts students with real-life problems as a motivator for learning. The essays in part 1 define and discuss the features of problem-based learning. Parts 2 and 3 treat some of the issues involved in beginning, or converting to, and designing and implementing a problem-based learning approach. Part 4 presents examples from different professions, including mechanical engineering, social work, optometry, architecture and construction management, nursing, legal training, and business and management. Assessment issues are covered in part 5. Problem-based learning's limitations and possible improvements are discussed in part 6. With its beginning in the medical sciences, this way of learning has expanded to other disciplines and the changes and expansions are not finished yet.

Johnson, David W., Roger T. Johnson, and Karl A. Smith.

Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom. Edina, Minn.: Interaction Book Company, 1998. (332 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Johnson, Johnson, and Smith combine theory, research, and practical application to a study of cooperative learning (over against individual learning and competitive learning). The three forms of cooperative learning groups-formal, informal, and cooperative base-are given separate treatment. Discussion of different types of cooperative learning techniques even includes suggestions for integrated use of all the approaches in one 50-minute class period. Group processing and grading are also treated. A six-page glossary of terms and a sixteen-page bibliography round out the book. This is a workbook with charts, diagrams, and exercises (with directions to complete them cooperatively, of course) and plenty of its practical ideas are transferable to the reading professor's courses.

COOPERATIVE LEARNING

Johnson, David W., Roger T. Johnson, and Karl A. Smith.

Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom. Edina, Minn.: Interaction Book Company, 1998. (332 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Johnson, Johnson, and Smith combine theory, research, and practical application to a study of cooperative learning (over against individual learning and competitive learning). The three forms of cooperative learning groups-formal, informal, and cooperative base-are given separate treatment. Discussion of different types of cooperative learning techniques even includes suggestions for integrated use of all the approaches in one 50-minute class period. Group processing and grading are also treated. A six-page glossary of terms and a sixteen-page bibliography round out the book. This is a workbook with charts, diagrams, and exercises (with directions to complete them cooperatively, of course) and plenty of its practical ideas are transferable to the reading professor's courses

Sego, Arlene F.

Cooperative Learning: A Classroom Guide. Adult Education Series. Cleveland: Info-Tec, 1991. (31 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Focusing on adult learners, this essay encourages cooperative learning-over against competitive learning and individualistic learning-as promising the most opportunities for success. "The intent of this document is to offer suggestions as to how classes can be organized for cooperative learning, activities that lend themselves to cooperation among students, benefits of and obstacles to cooperative learning, and how variations of cooperative learning can supplement virtually every teaching style" (p. 3).

LEARNING COMMUNITIES

Cross, K. Patricia, and Mimi Harris Steadman. Classroom Research: Implementing the Scholarship of Teaching. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996. (264 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This volume is written specifically to engage college teachers (and prospective college teachers) in the scholarship of teaching by encouraging them to use their classrooms as laboratories for the study of learning ("This book is about learning rather than teaching." p. xiv). Using four case studies, the authors seek to foster 1) collaborative discussions about teaching and learning, 2) interaction with recent research and learning theory, and 3) the ability to us classroom assessment and classroom research to further advance teaching effectiveness. With regard to the third goal, the authors assume the reader has access to Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross, Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2d ed, The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1993). While the volume is useful for individual readers, the authors have designed it for group use by teaching communities, for example, as a text in graduate courses, faculty development groups, teaching assistant programs, discipline-based faculty groups, etc. The four case studies (learning cases, not teaching cases) focus particularly on the following issues: 1) prerequisite knowledge, metacognition and learning strategies, self-confidence and motivation; 2) learning goals, deep and surface learning, student ratings of instruction; 3) peer learning, intellectual development and critical thinking; and 4) designing your own classroom research.

Wheeler, Gary S., ed.

Teaching and Learning in College: A Resource for Educators. 4th ed. Elyria, Ohio: Info-Tec, 2002. (211 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of articles updates the earlier edition and continues the ongoing discussion about teaching and learning. Six leading educators deal with these subjects: the role of community in learning, diversity and new roles for faculty developers, computing the value of teaching dialogues, teaching and learning in different academic settings, teaching and learning as a transactional process, and using assessment effectively.

SERVICE LEARNING

Cha, Stephen, and Michael Rothman.

Service Matters: A Sourcebook for Community Service in Higher Education. Providence, R.I.: Campus Compact, 1994. (175 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Bringing together information from over 400 institutions, this book presents more than 500 examples of service learning projects in higher education. The first chapter offers statistics about service learning and the second chapter discusses the foundational requirements for service learning. Chapters 3 and 4 present methods for instituting projects and Chapter 5 reviews the examples. The appendices offer scores of networking contacts for institutions seeking to develop service-learning initiatives.

Driscoll, Amy, et al.

Assessing the Impact of Service Learning: A Workbook of Strategies and Methods. 2d ed. Portland, Ore.: Portland State University, Center for Academic Excellence, 1998. (77 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Paying attention to diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment and concerned with both quantitative and qualitative measures, this volume offers a model for assessing the service-learning endeavors. The approaches are organized around the four constituencies of service learning: students, faculty, community, and institution. Sample forms are provided.

Eyler, Janet, and Dwight E. Giles, Jr.

Where's the Learning in Service-Learning? The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1999. (315 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC220.5 .E95 1999 CSUH-FCET Library

Written for both skeptics and believers in service learning, and written for both statistically oriented and for story oriented readers, this volume argues for the benefits of service learning in higher education. It matches service learning to specific and valued educational outcomes including personal and interpersonal development, understanding and applying knowledge, reflective practice, critical thinking, and citizenship. Appendices present the statistical details of the studies.

Heffernan, Kerrissa.

Fundamentals of Service-Learning Course Construction. Providence, R.I.: Campus Compact, 2001. (333 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Based upon Campus Compact's recent examination of over 900 service-learning syllabi, this volume aims to help faculty construct good syllabi incorporating service-learning values. Heffernan offers six different models for service-learning courses, sample service-learning assignments, and example syllabi (including some from courses that serve as civic bridges). A short bibliography and recommended reading list are included.

Jackson, Katherine, ed.

Redesigning Curricula: Models of Service Learning Syllabi. Providence, R.I.: Campus Compact, 1994. (160 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

The sequel to Campus Compact's report on service learning in Rethinking Tradition, edited by Tamar Y. Kupiec, this volume has less commentary and samples of syllabi for service-learning courses. Categories include business and economics, education and social theory, writing and the humanities, sociology, and health and sciences. Indexes are keyed to course titles, institutions, and instructors.

Kupiec, Tamar Y., ed.

Rethinking Tradition: Integrating Service with Academic Study on College Campuses. Providence, R.I.: Campus Compact, 1993. (211 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Based upon the summer institute experiences of 44 institutions involved in the Project on Integrating Service with Academic Study, this collection of articles presents issues that faculty and administrators will want to consider when exploring service learning. The issues cover rationale, principles of good practice, strategy, pedagogy, institutional development, and assessment. An appendix lists the institutions involved in the institute and gives some samples of course syllabi.

Rhoads, Robert A., and Jeffrey P. F. Howard, eds.

Academic Service Learning: A Pedagogy of Action and Reflection. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 73. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998. (101 pp.)
CSUH Library

-LC221 .A23 1998 CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of eleven articles stresses academic ties between service learning and formal course curriculum. The authors were asked "to consider service learning as a pedagogical model that intentionally integrates academic learning and relevant community service" (p. 1). Essays deal with the meaning, theoretical bases, pedagogy, disciplinary and value benefits, promotion, and future of service learning. The last chapter is a short annotated list of resources.

TECHNOLOGY

Arend, Bridget, et al.

How to Design, Develop, and Teach an Online Course. N.p.: Real Education, 1999. (166 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

The Instructional Design Team of Real Education compiled this spiral-bound and tab-indexed guide for faculty using the Real Education System online software for distributed learning. Although specifically written for use with a particular software system, some of the general design and pedagogical suggestions are transferable to other systems.

Boaz, Mary, et al.

Teaching at a Distance: A Handbook for Instructors. Mission Viejo, Calif.: League for Innovation in the Community College and Archipelago, 1999. (92 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

The collaboration of experienced distance educators produced this handbook as an introduction to the fundamentals of designing, implementing, and managing a distance learning course. Admittedly not exhaustive, it nevertheless, covers many important topics including fundamental questions and strategies, the use of various kinds of technology, methods of communication with students, and testing and assessment. A list of Web resources for distance educators and a glossary of terms are included.

Boettcher, Judith V., and Rita-Marie Conrad.

Faculty Guide for Moving Teaching and Learning to the Web. Mission Viejo, Calif.: League for Innovation in the Community College, 1999. (124 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Believing that the Web must be fully integrated into higher education, the authors offer this volume as a guide for applying computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web as our culture's most powerful information and knowledge tools. Chapters cover broad-based topics (e.g., principles of technology and change, principles of teaching and learning) and more detail-oriented subjects (e.g., design guidelines, steps in developing web courses, tools and resources for creating web courses).

Brownell, Blaine A.

Using Microcomputers: A Guidebook for Writers, Teachers, and Researchers in the Social Sciences. Beverly Hills: SAGE, 1985. (320 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

As the title shows (i.e., "microcomputer") this book is quite dated now and much of it will be of little interest (apart from historical curiosity) to faculty members in the twenty-first century. It introduces basic computer components and operating systems, and explains some of the simpler ideas like text entry, deleting, and copying. A good portion of the volume introduces various programs for word processing ("text processing"), database management, spreadsheets, and statistical analysis. Of course, some of the programs discussed are no longer available and some of today's best programs are missing.

CSU-SUNY-CUNY Joint Committee.

Fair Use of Copyrighted Works: A Crucial Element in Educating America. Discussion Series. Seal Beach, Calif.: Consortium for Educational Technology for University Systems, 1995. (34 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Summarizing the initial results of the joint committee from three university systems, this booklet argues that the effectiveness of higher education requires a thorough understanding and application (especially by faculty) of a fair-use doctrine concerning copyrighted works. They suggest a national alliance focused on fair use.

CSU-SUNY-CUNY Joint Committee.

Information Resources and Library

Services for Distance Learners: A Framework for Quality. Discussion Series. Seal Beach, Calif.: Consortium for Educational Technology for University Systems, 1997. (44 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Reviewing current practices and accreditation policies regarding information resources for distance education programs, this booklet recommends guidelines for developing and/or enhancing such practices and policies for distance learners.

CSU-SUNY-CUNY Joint Committee.

Ownership of New Works at the University: Unbundling of Rights and the Pursuit of Higher Learning. Discussion Series. Seal Beach, Calif.: Consortium for Educational Technology for University Systems, 1997. (33 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This booklet offers a framework for institutional conversations about the issues related to intellectual property. It is particularly concerned with establishing clearly the initial ownership of newly created material, understanding how ownership rights benefit all parties in academia, and developing new models for ownership that incorporates the influence of new technologies.

Lochte, Robert H.

Interactive Television and Instruction: A Guide to Technology, Technique, Facilities Design, and Classroom Management. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Educational Technology Publications, 1993. (136 pp.)
CSUH Library-LB1044.7 .L63 1993 CSUH-FCET Library

Written for secondary school and college-level instructors using video conferencing equipment for instructional purposes, this little handbook assumes the readers will be involved in a workshop where they will get hands-on experience with the equipment. The first three chapters explain the basics of television technology, the next three chapters discuss interactive television classes, and the final two chapters describe how to set up a teacher training workshop about video conferred instruction and how to design an interactive television classroom. One appendix offers sample forms and handouts; another appendix gives instruction in using an overhead camera.

Maran, Ruth.

Teach Yourself Visually Windows XP. New York: Hungry Minds, 2001. (307 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

In competition with the popular "Computers for Dummies" series, the "Teach Yourself Visually" series devotes as much space (or more) on each page to pictures as it does text. In fourteen full-color chapters, this book takes the reader from an introduction to MicroSoft's Windows software, through creating documents and pictures, to viewing and managing with files, to working with music and movies, to customizing and optimizing your computer's performance, to browsing the Web and e-mailing.

University of Notre Dame.

Changing the Process of Teaching and Learning: Essays by Notre Dame Faculty. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1994. (90 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This somewhat dated collection of 22 short essays records a variety of success stories regarding Notre Dame faculty of various disciplines using technology to enhance the teaching/learning enterprise. Frequently, the contributors comment on the technological wonders of DeBartolo Hall on the Notre Dame campus, which opened in 1992. Subjects discussed include interactive teaching with computers, use of e-mail for discussions, computerized writing, and multimedia presentations. Contributors come from the disciplines of accounting, business administration, chemistry, chemical engineering, classical and oriental languages and literatures, computer science and engineering, economics, electrical engineering, English/writing, finance, foreign languages, literature, psychology, sociology, and theology.

Whitehead, Paul.

Teach Yourself Visually Networking. 2d ed. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 2000. (305 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

In competition with the popular "Computers for Dummies" series, the "Teach Yourself Visually" series devotes as much space (or more) on each page to pictures as it does text. In eighteen full-color chapters, this book takes the reader from an introduction to networks, through network structure and hardware, through transmission media and network architecture, to network services and operating systems. Administration, protection, certifications, installation are covered as are intranets, wireless networks, and home networks.

Wing, Kelleigh, Paul Whitehead, and Ruth Maran.

Teach Yourself Internet and World Wide Web Visually. 2d ed. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1999. (301 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

In competition with the popular "Computers for Dummies" series, the "Teach Yourself Visually" series devotes as much space (or more) on each page to pictures as it does text. In fourteen full-color chapters, this book takes the reader from an introduction to the Internet, through getting connected and using the Web, to multimedia and e-mail, to searches and downloads, to newsgroups and chat rooms, and more.

WRITING

Adams, Peter Dow.

Connections: A Guide to the Basics of Writing. 2d ed. New York: HarperCollins, 1992. (544 + 104 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This spiral-bound textbook takes an inductive approach to helping students learn about writing. It emphasizes the process of writing, downplays terminology, and integrates grammar and mechanics. Many exercises are included. A separately numbered instructor's manual is bound at the end of this edition.

Blalock, Glenn.

Background Readings for Instructors Using The Bedford Handbook for Writers, Fourth Edition. 2d ed. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's, 1994. (495 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library (2 copies)

Blalock challenges new and experienced teachers of writing to consider how and why they teach as they do. He suggests solutions to common problems and concerns and offers references for further reading and study. The readings he has selected (half of which are new in this second edition) fit with the fourth edition of Diana Hacker's The Bedford Handbook for Writers. An appendix contains five articles on writing across the curriculum.

Connors, Robert, and Cheryl Glenn.

The St. Martin's Guide to Teaching Writing. 3rd ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. (480 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

With the assumptions that writing is teachable, that students learn via trial-and-error, and that teachers want to know what works in the classroom, Connors and Glenn have not intended this book to be a complete treatment of composition studies. Rather, they have designed the book to be a useful tool for practicing teachers. Part 1, "Practical Issues in Teaching Writing," is where novice teachers will want to begin, as it has chapters and/or sections on everything from "preparing for the first day" to "the end of the term," from "everyday activities" to "final grades." Part 2, "Theoretical Issues in Teaching Writing," is where more experienced teachers may want to begin. It discusses traditional rhetoric topics and the elements of composition with suggestions for classroom activities. Part 3 is an anthology of twelve essays linking theory and practice regarding the teaching of writing.

Daigle, Stephen.

Writing and Critical Reading for Learning Across the Disciplines. Academic Challenges. Long Beach, Calif.: Academic Program Improvement, [1984]. (20 pp.)
CSUH Library-LC152.C2 D34 1984 CSUH-FCET Library

This brief pamphlet reports on the nine Academic Program Improvement grant funded projects undertaken between 1980 and 1982 on California State University campuses regarding the training of faculty to teach writing and critical reading across the academic disciplines. It gives the background for this initiative, discusses writing as a tool for learning, and summarizes the projects. It closes with a report on how the project results were disseminated and offers some concluding implications.

Dupré, Lyn.

BUGS in Writing: A Guide to Debugging Your Prose. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1995. (649 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Written with a lack of hierarchy, this guide is not at all a style manual. Rather, it is a collection of 150 easily digestible, stand-alone segments intended to aid the reader in a delightful manner. It aims to help writers intuitively develop, on the one hand, the ability to recognize common errors and, on the other hand, "ear" for recognizing good writing. BUGS is Dupré's four-point scale for classifying her examples of improved writing style: Bad, Ugly, Good, and Splendid.

Ellsworth, Blanche.

English Simplified. 5th ed. Rev. John A. Higgins. New York: Harper & Row, 1985. (32 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

An ultimate, albeit dated, summary of English grammar and writing hints, this tool is a listing and explanation of the rules of the language. Besides grammar, the rules cover punctuation, mechanics, effective paragraphs, spelling, word usage, and documentation.

Fitzpatrick, Carolyn H., and Marybeth B. Ruscica.

The Complete Sentence Workout Book. 2d ed. Lexington, Mass. D. C. Heath and Company, 1988. (404 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This college-level workbook on grammar, punctuation, and fundamental composition concepts works toward the composing process (its last chapter) in a more traditional, grammar-first method. As a workbook, its perforated pages abound with exercises.

Hacker, Diana.

Resources for Research and Documentation Across the Curriculum: To Accompany The Bedford Handbook for Writers, Fourth Edition. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's, 1994. (123 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library (many copies)

This pocket-sized handbook reprints the MLA and APA documentation sections from The Bedford Handbook for Writers and includes a model for scientific documentation according to CBE style (Council of Biology Editors). Sample papers are included. An appendix offers a list of style manuals for various disciplines and the alternative MLA footnote/endnote style.

Hacker, Diana.

A Writer's Reference. 3rd ed. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's, 1995. (376 pp.)
CSUH Library

-PE1408 .H2778 1992 (2d ed.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This comb-bound (and thus lying flat) and tab-indexed handbook is designed for quick and easy use by writers in the revising and editing stages of writing. The "main menu" inside the front cover uses key letters and diagrams the tabs for functionality, while a more detailed table of contents is inside the back cover. Sections dividing this tool cover composition and style (composing and revising, document design, effective sentences, and word choice), correctness (grammatical sentences, ESL trouble spots, punctuation, and spelling and mechanics), and research and basic grammar (research writing, MLA documentation, alternative documentation styles, and basic grammar).

Herman, William.

The Basic Writer's Rhetoric. San Francisco: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1988. (247 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

A textbook for college courses in basic writing, this volume is oriented to writing as process and contains many exercises. After an introductory chapter, each chapter in part 1 (rhetoric) shares a similar outline with a free writing exercise, analysis of a sample of student writing, a reading selection, a methodology lesson, a writing assignment, and some working exercises. The chapters cover such writing basics as description, narration, comparison and contrast, classification, definition, and argument. Part 2 covers English grammar and is also replete with exercises.

Hult, Christine A.

Research and Writing in the Humanities and Arts. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1996. (149 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Written for students, this book can serve as both a college-level textbook on research and a style guide/reference tool for writing. Hult covers college research in general, library resources (including electronic and on-line resources), research methods, and planning and writing research papers. The author discusses some of the uniqueness of researching in the humanities and the arts and recommends MLA style. See her similarly outlined Research and Writing in the Social Sciences for APA style and her Researching and Writing in the Sciences and Technology for CBE style. Cf. her Researching and Writing Across the Curriculum.

Hult, Christine A.

Research and Writing in the Social Sciences. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1996. (192 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Written for students, this book can serve as both a college-level textbook on research and a style guide/reference tool for writing. Hult covers college research in general, library resources (including electronic and on-line resources), research methods, and planning and writing research papers. The author discusses some of the uniqueness of researching in the social sciences and recommends APA style. See her similarly outlined Research and Writing in the Humanities and Arts for MLA style and her Researching and Writing in the Sciences and Technology for CBE style. See also her Researching and Writing Across the Curriculum.

Hult, Christine A.

Researching and Writing Across the Curriculum. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1996. (388 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

In this book Hult combines the resources of the other three volumes (Research and Writing in the Humanities and Arts, Research and Writing in the Social Sciences, and Researching and Writing in the Sciences and Technology) with a similar, but expanded, outline. She distinguishes both research and writing between the disciplines of science and technology, social science, the humanities, and business and presents differing models with samples using CBE, APA, MLA, and Chicago styles, respectively.

Hult, Christine A.

Researching and Writing in the Sciences and Technology. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1996. (168 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Written for students, this book can serve as both a college-level textbook on research and a style guide/reference tool for writing. Hult covers college research in general, library resources (including electronic and on-line resources), research methods, and planning and writing research papers. The author discusses some of the uniqueness of researching in the sciences and recommends CBE style. See her similarly outlined Research and Writing in the Humanities and Arts for MLA style and her Research and Writing in the Social Sciences for APA style. See also her Researching and Writing Across the Curriculum.

Markland, Murray F., ed.

How to Increase Literacy without Becoming an English Teacher. Chico, Calif.: California State University, Chico, no date. (24 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Members of the English Department at CSU, Chico contribute brief essays with suggestions for teachers of courses other than English composition about working with students on writing in their courses. Topics include frequently asked questions about using writing, evaluating and responding to student writing, making clear writing assignments, improving writing through marginal comments, using writing in the classroom beyond the formal essay.

Meyer, Emily, and Louise Z. Smith.

The Practical Tutor. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. (345 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Intended for tutors of composition, this volume seeks to apply research to the pedagogy of addressing particular problems writers have. It is a handbook for tutors and begins with two chapters on "getting acquainted," i.e., meeting and talking with the writer. Successive chapters cover issues related to generating ideas, shaping ideas, and correcting errors. One chapter addresses the issues involve in tutoring spelling and vocabulary and another chapter discusses tutoring with computers. Each of the book's chapter has practical suggestions for journal entries, further writing, class activities, and further reading.

Moss, Andrew, and Carol Holder.

Improving Student Writing: A Guidebook for Faculty in All Disciplines. Pomona, Calif.: California State Polytechnic University, 1982. (57 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

The authors' research work with faculty in a variety of disciplines (e.g., engineering, art history, biology, and political science) resulted in the production of this guide with practical methods and ideas for teachers to use in helping students improve their writing. Chapters cover assigning writing (design of assignments, use of journaling, etc.), samples of assignments that work (in agricultural engineering, American studies, biology, chemistry, counseling, and criminal justice), essay exams, helping strategies, integration of reading and writing, and evaluation of student writing. Several succinct checklists are provided.

Mulderig, Gerald P.

The Heath Handbook. 13th ed. Instructor's Annotated Edition. Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath and Company, 1995. (884 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Compared to Edwin C. Woolley's 1907 first edition, this thirteenth edition shows much change and yet maintains a devotion to thoroughness and clarity. Mulderig has striven to make this edition "the most complete, most accessible version ever published" (p. iii). Its forty-three chapters cover everything from planning to writing and revising; from critical reading and thinking to the research paper; from grammatical usage to punctuation, spelling, and mechanics; from letters and resumes to writing pressure and word processing. A chapter on writing English as a second language and separately paginated glossaries and an index round out the volume. As the instructor's annotated edition, this volume is oddly shaped with each page an additional 40% longer than the student edition.

Petersen, Art.

Petersen's Handbook for Writers of Academic Papers. 2d ed. rev. Murphy, Ore.: Castle Peak Editions, 1994. (72 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Designed for students, this brief handbook focuses on the traditional academic paper (including the research paper) using the MLA format. A glossary of usage, a list of common abbreviations, and alphabetized explanations of common editing ("writing reference and correction") notations are presented. The preface includes a list of discipline specific specialized manuals for writing.

Peterson, Rai.

The Writing Teacher's Companion: Planning, Teaching, and Evaluating in the Composition Classroom. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995. (161 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Truly a how-to manual for writing instructors, this book covers organizing, assessing, managing, and selecting textbooks for college-level composition courses. The author addresses basic course plans, classroom instruction techniques, various kinds of assignments, essay marking and grading, and course policies. She even devotes a chapter to diversity.

Pierson, Ruth, and Susan Vik.

Making Sense in English: Intermediate Grammar in Context. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1987. (292 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

As a text for intermediate students of English as a second language, this workbook attempts to provide more interesting contexts and exercises with which to move ahead in understanding the more complex grammatical features of the language. Each chapter follows the same basic pattern of opening passage and comprehension exercise, discussion of grammar rules, exercises, an integration exercise, a vocabulary exercise, and questions for discussion and writing. The last chapter is all integrative exercises.

Sudol, Ronald A., ed.

Revising: New Essays for Teachers of Writing. Urbana, Ill.: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills/ the National Council of Teachers of English, 1982. (187 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

This collection of sixteen articles discusses the idea of revision in terms of editing, critical thinking, teaching, and learning. Background articles address communication theory, cognitive psychology, rhetoric, and style. Application articles examine the workshop model, college-wide curriculum, psycholinguistics, the Cloze test, the Freudian slip, peer evaluation, the Delphi technique, and several aspects of the student-teacher relationship.

Wiley, Mark, Barbara Gleason, and Louise Wetherbee Phelps.

Composition in Four Keys: Inquiring into the Field: Nature, Art, Science, Politics. Mountain View, Calif.: Mayfield, 1996. (600 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Using the term "key" in the musical sense, the authors have compiled this anthology of articles (mostly from the 1970's and 1980's) to aid would-be writers (graduate and undergraduate developing scholars) to get a better grasp of how rhetoric and composition work together in distinct fields. Each of the four main sections (Nature, Art, Science, and Politics) is introduce by one of the book's authors and includes some exercises and suggested reading. A fifth section introduces some alternative ways to map rhetoric and compositional disciplinary distinctions.

Williams, James D.

Preparing to Teach Writing. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 1989. (350 pp.)
CSUH-FCET Library

Williams claims this book "does what other books on composition instruction have not adequately accomplished: It balances an in-depth discussion of theory and research with a detailed presentation of effective teaching methods" (p. xiv). It is designed as a text for training teachers of writing with part 1 (chapters 1-7) discussing research and theory about writing pedagogy (e.g., rhetoric, reading, grammar, style, ESL) and part 2 (chapters 8-11) focusing on practical methods of instruction (e.g., groups, nonmainstream students, writing assignments, assessing writing).

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