REGIONAL: CSU campuses denying admission to new students

  • July 10, 2009

California State University campuses will not accept student applications for the 2010 spring semester term, a move that will affect thousands of Bay Area students looking to attend local schools, a CSU spokeswoman said today.

CSU schools also stopped accepting applications for the 2010 winter and spring terms for campuses on the quarter system as of July 6. CSU East Bay is among the six state schools on the quarter system.

The decision, which was announced Thursday, is an attempt to address a reduction of $584 million in funding from the state in the 2009-2010 budget, according to CSU spokeswoman Claudia Keith.

About 35,000 students are usually admitted at CSU campuses each spring semester, Keith said. In 2008, about 1,200 of those students were first-time freshmen, while the rest were community college transfers or graduate students, she said.

At San Francisco State University, about 2,500 students are generally admitted for spring semesters, according to Jo Volkert, the school's associate vice president of enrollment planning and management.

Volkert said most of those are community college students who will have to make a decision to wait until the fall or to look at other available schools.

"If they're eligible for admission, they've probably completed all their credits at the community college, so they'll either just have to wait until the fall or choose another institution that's open, like a private college," she said.

CSU East Bay, which has campuses in Hayward and Concord, will also be closed for admission for the winter and spring.

CSU East Bay may be one of a few schools that will be able to offer admission to certain students as limited exceptions, according to India Christman, the school's executive director of enrollment management.

"We're waiting for clarification from the chancellor's office, because there are various populations of students that, for one reason or another, we realize we really need to make a special exception for," Christman said.

Keith said that some of the exceptions would be because some schools have pre-existing admission agreements with community colleges.

"We don't want them to break the agreements, so there may be very few exceptions, but it's not going to be a lot," she said.
CSU East Bay admitted 3,100 students last winter quarter, as well as 2,500 last spring.

Sonoma State University, another school affected by the decision, admitted 311 new students in the 2009 spring semester, but has no plans to allow any in the upcoming spring term.

Furloughs have been proposed for all employees in the CSU system as another way to address the budget deficit, according to Keith. The administration has already agreed to start furloughing two days a month starting Aug. 1, Keith said.

Further decisions on furloughs, as well as a possible 20 percent student fee increase and other enrollment plans, will be considered at the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach on July 21.

Keith said that the CSU system will also be admitting less students in the fall, and that it will be harder to go to a school that is not in the immediate area of an applicant.

The University of California system will still be accepting applications for the upcoming terms, but UC President Mark Yudof announced a plan today to offset an anticipated $813 million budget reduction.

The proposed plan would fill the budget gap with a previously approved student fee increase, a modified furlough plan, refinancing of debt, further administrative cost controls, and cuts spread across the 10 UC campuses.

The specifics of those cuts will be left to individual chancellors, who will make presentations at a Board of Regents finance and compensation committee meeting Wednesday in San Francisco.

The meeting is scheduled for 10:15 a.m. in the Mission Bay Community Center at the UC San Francisco Mission Bay campus, located at 1675 Owens St.

"Within the University of California we're going to have to look at everything, at where the revenue is coming from and how to enhance it, and how to reduce expenditures without closing the door to student opportunity and research," Yudof said in a statement.

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