Cal State East Bay continues to gather feedback for master plan

  • December 11, 2008

By Kristofer Noceda
The Daily Review

Posted: 12/11/2008


HAYWARD - Traffic remained a major concern for residents during a forum held Tuesday evening to gather community feedback on Cal State East Bay's master plan.

Neighbors are worried future growth on campus would translate into more congestion on narrow streets that surround the university.

"(The plan) is inadequate on transportation," said Sherman Lewis, president of the Hayward Area Planning Association. "The plan would require auto dependency. I believe that it would be more efficient and sustainable to provide more public transit access to campus."

Linda Dalton, vice president of planning and enrollment development for the school, said the university is looking into such concerns and "will do everything we can to increase transit use."

Expected growth in the coming years prompted the university to revise its master plan, which was last updated in 1963. A draft of the plan - which provides an outline for long-term planning on land use, student and employee housing, traffic, parking, student services and other future development - and its required environmental impact report was unveiled during Tuesday's forum.

"This is a major opportunity to look at our future," Dalton said during the forum. About 30 residents, faculty, staff and students attended the meeting.

Much of the past two years has been spent on creating a plan to guide the university's future, and was shaped by a series of town hall meetings.

The plan was also formed with the help of the city of Hayward and other community and campus stakeholders, and would take about 20 years to complete.

At that time, the university is expected to be a "vibrant university village" boasting 18,000 students and additional student-housing neighborhoods. Cal State East Bay currently enrolls more than 13,500 students.

Cal State East Bay's Associated Students, Inc., supports the plan.

"The master plan is going in the right direction and foresees the right plan in terms of expansion and growth," said Udeepto Maheshwari, ASI president. "The general student body is very excited about the fact the university plans to put in more housing."

In addition, officials are proposing to build another main entrance into campus.

Carlos Bee Boulevard and Harder Road currently are the only two entry points that feed into the Hayward university, and the plan calls for a third and "more dramatic" entrance off Hayward Boulevard on the eastern edge of campus, with distinctive landscaping.

Creating a more "memorable impression of the campus" is also a goal in the plan, which has identified sections of campus where "special identity" buildings could be constructed.

The master plan is expected to go before the CSU board of trustees in early 2009.

Cal State East Bay officials will continue to gather community feedback up to Dec. 24. For more information, visit www.aba.csueastbay.edu/FACPLAN/default.htm, or contact Jim Zavagno at 510-885-4149 or jim.zavagno@csueastbay.edu. Letters can be sent to Zavagno at California State University, East Bay, Facilities Planning & Operations, Room Number ST 170, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542.


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