Hybrid FAQs

  1. What is a "hybrid" class?
  2. How does a "hybrid" class differ from an "online" class?
  3. How do students choose to enroll in hybrid classes?
  4. Is it ok to list a class as "face-to-face" and then decide to teach it as a hybrid class after the schedule has been printed?
  5. What happens if an instructor indicates a course is "face-to-face" but then ends up needing to attend a conference for one session so, as an alternative instructional plan, asks students to rely on posted online assignments for that one meeting?
  6. Are there any disadvantages for labeling a course as "hybrid"? For example, if a course is noted as "hybrid," and then the instructor decides that an online session is not necessary after all, would there be a negative impact for the student/department/instructor?
  7. What should I think about before deciding whether or not I want to teach a hybrid class?
  8. I want to teach a hybrid class. What process do I need to follow?
  9. How do I prepare my students for a successful hybrid experience?
  10. I need help understanding how to effectively redesign my face-to-face class for a hybrid learning experience. Where can I go for help?

What is a "hybrid" class?

At CSU East Bay, "hybrid" is a term used to describe a class in which at least one session is scheduled to be held online.

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How does a "hybrid" class differ from an "online" class?

An online class meets entirely online except for test(s) which may require coming to campus or arranging an off-site proctored exam. A hybrid class meets partially but not entirely online.

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How do students choose to enroll in hybrid classes?

All courses listed in the Schedule of Classes are assumed to be face-to-face unless there is a notation of "hybrid" or "online." Students enroll or register in hybrid classes in the same manner as they register for face-to-face and online classes.

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Is it ok to list a class as "face-to-face" and then decide to teach it as a hybrid class after the schedule has been printed?

No, this is not ok for two reasons. One, it violates the Senate policy on Online and Hybrid Instruction and, two, it is unfair to students who have made a clear choice not to learn online for a variety of reasons (learning style, disability, limited/no computer access, lack of technical skills, etc). The Online and Hybrid Instruction Senate policy may be viewed online at: http://www20.csueastbay.edu/faculty/senate/files/documents/06-07/06-07%20BEC%205.Online-hybrid%20Instruction%20Policy.revised.pdf

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What happens if an instructor indicates a course is "face-to-face" but then ends up needing to attend a conference for one session so, as an alternative instructional plan, asks students to rely on posted online assignments for that one meeting?

By definition, this scenario makes the class "hybrid" so what are the ramifications? If an unforeseen event like this happens, then the instructor can make alternative arrangements for the missed class after consultation and approval of the arrangements by the department chair and/or Dean. Instructors are advised, however, to ensure this alternative is accessible to all students, regardless of disability or access to a computer.

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Are there any disadvantages for labeling a course as "hybrid"? For example, if a course is noted as "hybrid," and then the instructor decides that an online session is not necessary after all, would there be a negative impact for the student/department/instructor?

Yes, we are misinforming our students and it might hurt enrollment in the course because some students do not want any online sessions or prefer to have online sessions.

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What should I think about before deciding whether or not I want to teach a hybrid class?

There are many things to consider before teaching a hybrid class. First, it's important to have a dialogue with your department chair about your interests. Second, you need to ensure that your course material is amenable to hybrid delivery. Also, you should consider your comfort level with technology, particularly Blackboard, CSU East Bay's Learning Management System. If you would like to receive information about Blackboard training, contact the Online and Hybrid Support Center (see below).

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I want to teach a hybrid class. What process do I need to follow?

First you should check with your department chair to see if the course has been approved to be offered in a hybrid format. If not, you should ask your department chair to fill out the Online and Hybrid Modification Request Form for Existing Courses. This form may be found online at http://www20.csueastbay.edu/academic/colleges-and-departments/apgs/cpm/forms.html. After approval at the department level, the request is sent to the College Curricular Committee for final approval. Once you have determined that the course has been approved to be offered in a hybrid mode, then you need to request permission from the department chair to offer the course as in hybrid format. This is the time to discuss course caps, scheduling patterns, and other issues. If the chair approves, then the department staff will enter it into the schedule as a hybrid course.

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How do I prepare my students for a successful hybrid experience?

Your syllabus should clearly indicate which course sessions will be held in person and which will be online. Your syllabus should include clear expectations for your students for the online and face-to-face sessions so they are clear, in advance, about what is expected of them. You can direct the students to the Online Campus website for information on online learning, equipment needs, and technical support: http://www.csueastbay.edu/online

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I need help understanding how to effectively redesign my face-to-face class for a hybrid learning experience. Where can I go for help?

You are encouraged to contact Bonnie Correia or Bernie Salvador in the Online and Hybrid Support Center to request a personal hybrid instructional design consultation. Hybrid teaching is an exciting new way to engage your students and involves exploring new ways of developing online content and crafting meaningful learning activities outside of the classroom.

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You may contact a member of the OHSC directly or submit a request for your personal hybrid instructional design consultation through the Service Desk and you will be contacted shortly.

Online and Hybrid Support Center (LI2800)
Instructional Designers:
Bonnie Correia (5-4878)
Meg Taggart Wright (5-2641)

Lead Instructional Designer:
Bernie Salvador (5-2562)

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